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Accessibility

Accessibility

Business-events.org.uk accessibility statement

Free Rein Ltd is committed to providing a website that is accessible to the widest possible audience, including people with visual, hearing, cognitive or motor impairments. The website follows the World Wide Web Consortium's Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. Maintaining an accessible site is an ongoing process and we are continually working to provide the most inclusive experience we can.

Please note that content from external sites that we link to or present on our site may not yet reach these standards. For example, we may use third party YouTube videos which are not fully compliant because they are from sources that are not within our direct control.

Business-events.org.uk accessibility preferences

You can change the way this website looks to suit your preferences. The settings that do this differs from browser to browser, but most browsers offer some or all of the following:

Increasing the font size. If you find the size of the text on Business-events.org.uk too small you can easily adjust it by using the font size setting in your browser. If you use Internet Explorer 6, go to the "View" menu, select "Text Size" and then select "Larger". If you use Internet Explorer 7 and 8 or Firefox, you can resize text using the zoom function by pressing and holding down "Ctrl" and "+". This will then zoom in allowing users with low vision to see the text more clearly. Use "Ctrl" and "-" to decrease the zoom again.

Adjusting text and colour changes. Some users who rely on screen magnifiers can find white backgrounds give off a glare. You can change both the background and the text on business-events.org.uk by changing some settings in your browsers. If you use Internet Explorer, look in the 'Tools' menu, select "Internet Options", select "Colors" and make changes to text and background colours in the "Colors" panel.

 PDFs and accessibility

Many of the documents on business-events.org.uk are forms or publications created in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF). Adobe Reader enables you to read PDFs. The latest versions of Adobe Reader (7.0 and above) offer more in the way of accessibility than earlier versions. You can find the latest version of Adobe Reader on the Adobe website - Opens in a new window.

Accessibility Wizard

If you use Windows, there is a program called Accessibility Wizard that enables you to set preferences for using your PC and the internet. To find the Accessibility Wizard, look in the Start menu, select "Programs", select "Accessories", select "Accessibility", select the "Accessibility Wizard" and then follow the instructions.

Feedback about Business-events.org.uk accessibility

Your suggestions and feedback on how to improve accessibility on Business-events.org.uk are very much appreciated. If you are experiencing any difficulties accessing the information on our pages or would like to send us some feedback in general, please click here and send us an email.

Further information

For further information on various disabilities, there are links to pages on the BBC website. Accessibility agencies encourage linking to the BBC website as it is known to be extremely useful and comprehensive.

You can find step-by-step details of how to optimise the user experience of Business-events.org.uk for users with difficulties or impairments on the BBC My web my way website - Opens in a new window.

Difficulties that people who are blind or who have visual impairments may encounter:

Visual impairments include low vision, colour blindness, and blindness. There are many options to modify the computer display and appearance so it is more legible, or to receive information through sound or touch.

Find general information about optimising the user experience for people who are blind on the BBC My web my way website - Opens in a new window.

Find general information about optimising the user experience for people who have visual impairments on the BBC My web my way website - Opens in a new window.

If you have visual impairments, you may be interested in the following assistive technology:

Difficulties that people with mobility or dexterity difficulties may encounter

Individuals with mobility or dexterity difficulties may not have much control over their limbs or may experience pain, discomfort, or loss of feeling in their fingers, hands, wrists, or arms, making it difficult to use a standard keyboard or mouse.

Find general information about optimising the user experience for people who have mobility or dexterity difficulties on the BBC My web my way website - Opens in a new window.

Please note that in certain circumstances, calendar widget functionality on the website is accessed by using the Ctrl plus arrow keys in internet explorer.

If you have mobility or dexterity difficulties, you may be interested in the following assistive technology:

Voice-activated software, also called speech recognition software, allows you to enter data using your voice rather than a mouse or keyboard.

On-screen keyboard programs provide an image of a standard or modified keyboard on the computer screen. You can select the keys with a mouse, touch screen, trackball, joystick, switch technology, or electronic pointing device.

Touch screens are devices placed on the computer monitor (or built into it) that allow direct selection or activation of the computer by touching the screen.

Keyboard filters include typing aids, such as word prediction utilities and add-on spelling checkers. These products reduce the required number of keystrokes. Keyboard filters enable users to quickly access the letters they need and to avoid inadvertently selecting keys they don't want.

Alternative input devices include alternative keyboards, expanded, guarded keyboards, electronic pointing devices, sip-and-puff systems, wands and sticks, joysticks and trackballs. They allow you to control your computer through means other than a standard keyboard or pointing device.

 Difficulties that people who are deaf or who have hearing difficulties may encounter

Hearing difficulties can range from slight hearing loss to deafness. People who are deaf or who have hearing difficulties might be able to hear some sound but might not be able to distinguish words.

Find general information about optimising the user experience for people who are deaf or who have hearing difficulties on the BBC My web my way website - Opens in a new window.

Difficulties that people with learning difficulties may encounter

Learning difficulties can range from conditions such as dyslexia and attention deficit disorder to retardation. Many individuals with learning difficulties are perfectly capable of learning if information is presented to them in a form and at a pace that is appropriate to them individually.

Find general information about optimising the user experience for people who have difficulty with words on the BBC My web my way website - Opens in a new window.

If you have learning difficulties, you may be interested in the following assistive technology:

Word prediction programs allow you to select a desired word from a list of words predicted by the first one or two letters typed. You can then select the word from the list and insert it into the text by typing a number, clicking the mouse or scanning with switch technology.

Reading comprehension programs focus on establishing or improving reading skills through ready-made activities, stories, exercises or games. These programs can help practice letter/sound recognition and can increase the understanding of words.

Reading tools and learning disability programs include software designed to make text-based materials more accessible for people who have problems reading. Options can include reformatting, navigating, scanning or speaking text out loud.

Speech synthesisers (often referred to as text-to-speech systems) receive information going to the screen and then 'speak' it out loud. Individuals who have lost the ability to communicate orally can use a speech synthesiser to communicate by typing information and having the speech synthesiser speak it out loud.

Voice-activated software, also called speech recognition software, allows you to enter data using your voice rather than a mouse or keyboard.

 Difficulties that people who are ageing may encounter on the internet

As we get older many of us will develop vision, hearing, dexterity or mobility conditions that may affect us when using a computer.

Trouble seeing the screen

If you have trouble seeing the screen you could:

Find details of how to make your text larger on the BBC My web my way website - Opens in a new window.

Find details of how to magnify your screen on the BBC My web my way website - Opens in a new window.

Find details of how to change text and background colours on the BBC My web my way website - Opens in a new window.

Difficulty hearing computer sounds

If you have difficulty hearing computer sounds you could:

Difficulty typing or controlling the mouse

If you experience difficulties when typing or controlling the mouse you could:

Find details of how to make your keyboard easier to use on the BBC My web my way website - Opens in a new window.

Find details of how to make your mouse easier to use on the BBC My web my way website - Opens in a new window.

Find details of how to make your mouse pointer easier to see on the BBC My web my way website - Opens in a new window.